Episode 147 – A good way to quit smoking

Today’s #AskEvro show question of the day is: “Is there a good way to quit smoking without getting so sick that I cannot work out?“

This was another interesting question from one of my friends Victor* who was not only a chronic workaholic and chainsmoker but also recognised the need to be healthy. In short, he was trying to do too much and was very much overloading his life in the short term.

But there is light at the end of the tunnel for Victor – and you can see it in the way he asks the question.

“Is there a good way to quit smoking…”

In response to this part of his question these are the most important things to highlight.

First things first

It’s great that he recognised that he wants to quit. It’s easier once you have made the decision to pursue a new direction. Conversely, it’s almost impossible if you try to force someone to do it.

All he needs is a deeper “why factor” and then the motivation to succeed will sustain the momentum for the new direction. Eventually habit will take over and the outcome, inevitable.

The second part of this answer to realise is:

1. Are you physiologically addicted to the smoking?

To clarify, are you addicted to the nicotine and the other chemicals that are in cigarettes?

If it is physiological, ask yourself,

“What else can give me the buzz (or energy) I need?“

Then simply replace the bad habit of smoking with:

 

Read on below.

 

 

a. Stimulants such as drinking green teas (or coffee)
b. Physical activities so you get another burst of energy.
c. Drinking more water so you can help to increase your metabolism.
d. Sleeping more at night
e. Napping during your energy lulls so you can recharge.
f. Meditation to focus on enhancing your oxygen supply to the body and mind.

2. Is it a psychological addiction?

There are some interesting emotional drawcards of smoking such as the “need to”

  • “Have something in my mouth” (possible childhood development issue or perhaps an expression of sexuality)
  • “Focus inward on my breathing” (aka. Meditation or a need for #metime and introspection)
  • “Fit in or relate to my friends. They all do it so I started to do it.” (confidence or self-esteem issue)
  • “Feel like a real man, you know” (victim of advertising propaganda)
  • “Do something with my hands because I get bored” (self-esteem or general life direction issue)

These are all interesting responses I’ve heard in my time as a coach and are more complex and irrational than they seem. Some responses even seem comical but they are “real” to the person who is in the situation of smoking for psychological reasons. Even my possible labels (in brackets) for those responses may not seem apparent or appropriate to solve these possible psychological issues to the client – they are simply stuck in their own mental prison (until they notice the jail door is actually open).

If you relate to one or more of these psychological responses your addiction may be psychological and it would be best to see a psychologist or NLP practitioner to help you to navigate your mind and assist in the removal of your emotional attachment to smoking.

Remember: You can succeed in anything in life – dream it, believe it, prepare and then go do it.

Goodluck!

Photo by Amritanshu Sikdar on Unsplash

Chris Everingham lives and breathes health & fitness.

Chris Everingham lives and breathes health & fitness. International Athlete, Elite Performance Manager for the Philippine Volcanoes rugby teams, qualified Dietitian / Nutritionist and qualified educator. Chris Everingham combines more than 10 years of experience and education together to deliver the best strategies to grow your mindset, rewire your habits and transform your life.

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