Episode 38 – Three snack traps to master

 

Snacks.

 

Love them or hate them they’re here to stay in our food supply. 

 

There is a problem with snacks though: not all of them are created equal – nor will they ever be. So, what has everyone been doing wrong? There seems to a be a general lack of critical thinking across the board and a reliance on “gut feelings” (excuse the pun).

Whereas, the secret to finding a healthy (and tasty) snack is to be able to differentiate between your impulses and “wants” versus your actual body and mind needs. 

Here are a few snack traps and their quick and easy healthy alternatives to help you master your health and fitness for life!

 

How hard can snacking be? Right?!

First and foremost, you’re human so it can be easy to fall into one or more of these traps. Time to rise above these:

 

Bad habits

Yes, it happens to even the best from time to time. When you’re tired, busy or both – you’re most likely to fall onto your default choices to save time and energy.  If you’ve never thought about it, you’re likely to have made snack choices based on taste over health benefits or nutrient value. That’s ok, read on to see how to fix it.

 

How to overcome bad habits in snacking:

At the start of the week when you are feeling fresh – plan ahead. Look at an overview of your calendar and then identify when you usually eat snacks as well as, what your default options are. If you’re not eating health foods, switch them out with better alternatives by locating a new healthy source nearby. Good options include a healthy food stand, salad station or even sushi trains.

 

What are the other 2 habits to master? Read on.

 

 

Laziness

There’ll always a time in your life that you’ll come across laziness – some more frequent than others – but it happens. Don’t get disheartened, the first step is to identify it and then address it.

 

How to overcome laziness in snacking:

Similar to breaking bad habits, it’s important to plan ahead. It’s even more important though to work out why you’re lazy and work to eliminate your laziness. Often the problem is best solved not when you solve the problem but rather after you remove or improve the elements that are creating the laziness in the first place! This may be personal mindset skills or even simpler things like, starting real energy management through exercise as opposed to the “little buzz” you get from sugar highs. The other aspect is to look at your motivations and drivers. If you don’t have a goal or reason (and are “floating” around on Earth), if might be time to have a heart-to-heart with yourself.

 

Small budget

The other common trap is being a little too stingy when buying snacks. It’s likely that you’ll choose snacks based on “cheapness” or perceived “value” over real nutrient value.

 

How to overcome the small budget:

Sometimes it’s about looking at value from a different perspective. What are you actually buying? When a Nutritionist or Dietitian (and even athletes) look at food they will consider the nutritional value of the product. If it’s delivering all the vitamins and minerals it needs, then it’s a winner! If it’s just a pile of sugar, salt and cheap carbs  (or fat), then you should consider upgrading your purchases for real nutrient value. “Dollar per nutrient” is a better measure than “dollar per gram.”

 

Snack Master

Get to it! Mastering your snacking habits is easy once you understand the foundations and why you act the way you do. Work with these three essential healthy snack habits to build a better you.

 

-Herson Rodriguez thank you for the photo

Bibliography

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Chris Everingham lives and breathes health & fitness.

Chris Everingham lives and breathes health & fitness. International Athlete, Elite Performance Manager for the Philippine Volcanoes rugby teams, qualified Dietitian / Nutritionist and qualified educator. Chris Everingham combines more than 10 years of experience and education together to deliver the best strategies to grow your mindset, rewire your habits and transform your life.

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